Friday, May 1, 2009

Bloggers Unite Against Disabilsm May 1

When my power chair needs a new battery: $98 at local auto store, $350 to have a person stop by my home and install one. I contacted my local National Multiple Sclerosis chapter, could they help me? Could they pick up an auto parts battery for me and install it? Nope. They referred me back to the power chair monopoly store in my city. Thanks a lot.
I and millions of others can’t replace our own dead power chair and scooter batteries. The sellers of the disabled, or S.O.D. (from Merriam Webster: British--Bugger: If I ever find the sod I’ll kill him---John Le Carre) know they have us over a barrel. Sods, each and every one of them. They won’t tell you the cost of a power chair until they see how much they will wring from your insurance. They laugh smugly all the way to the bank.
There was an elderly woman who desperately needed a power chair, but she was poor, on Medicaid, and didn’t think she could afford one. I convinced her to call Medicaid and she had her chair the next month. It gave her a life! We met for coffee and laughs each weekend.
When I hadn’t seen her in awhile I asked around and was told her battery died and no one would come to her apt. to replace it. Once again she was trapped in her studio apt., just two blocks from a mini-mall full of cheap coffee, lots of people-watching, and, well, me!
This is another SOB, oops my bad, SOD trick to make money. So I contacted them and threatened to report them to the Washington State Atty. General’s office; I also spoke to a rep. for the company owner located in Oregon. The next week Lillian was back in her power chair. They went to her apt. and replaced the battery, bill to Medicaid.
If you are disabled and have “people” like Montel Williams (for a grab out of the hat example) or family members nearby, then you can bypass some SOBs, er, SODs, (So sorry, my numb finger hit’s the wrong letter.) and get on with life without skipping a beat. But it will be many moons (interpret as you wish) before there is a retail store selling reasonably priced products for people with disabilities. Is this discrimination? Well, what do YOU think?

6 comments:

Queers United said...

When my power chair needs a new battery: $98 at local auto store, $350 to have a person stop by my home and install one. I contacted my local National Multiple Sclerosis chapter, could they help me? Could they pick up an auto parts battery for me and install it? Nope. They referred me back to the power chair monopoly store in my city. Thanks a lot.
I and millions of others can’t replace our own dead power chair and scooter batteries. The sellers of the disabled, or S.O.D. (from Merriam Webster: British--Bugger: If I ever find the sod I’ll kill him---John Le Carre) know they have us over a barrel. Sods, each and every one of them. They won’t tell you the cost of a power chair until they see how much they will wring from your insurance. They laugh smugly all the way to the bank.
There was an elderly woman who desperately needed a power chair, but she was poor, on Medicaid, and didn’t think she could afford one. I convinced her to call Medicaid and she had her chair the next month. It gave her a life! We met for coffee and laughs each weekend.
When I hadn’t seen her in awhile I asked around and was told her battery died and no one would come to her apt. to replace it. Once again she was trapped in her studio apt., just two blocks from a mini-mall full of cheap coffee, lots of people-watching, and, well, me!
This is another SOB, oops my bad, SOD trick to make money. So I contacted them and threatened to report them to the Washington State Atty. General’s office; I also spoke to a rep. for the company owner located in Oregon. The next week Lillian was back in her power chair. They went to her apt. and replaced the battery, bill to Medicaid.
If you are disabled and have “people” like Montel Williams (for a grab out of the hat example) or family members nearby, then you can bypass some SOBs, er, SODs, (So sorry, my numb finger hit’s the wrong letter.) and get on with life without skipping a beat. But it will be many moons (interpret as you wish) before there is a retail store selling reasonably priced products for people with disabilities. Is this discrimination? Well, what do YOU think?

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Char / Stitchary! said...

When my power chair needs a new battery: $98 at local auto store, $350 to have a person stop by my home and install one. I contacted my local National Multiple Sclerosis chapter, could they help me? Could they pick up an auto parts battery for me and install it? Nope. They referred me back to the power chair monopoly store in my city. Thanks a lot.
I and millions of others can’t replace our own dead power chair and scooter batteries. The sellers of the disabled, or S.O.D. (from Merriam Webster: British--Bugger: If I ever find the sod I’ll kill him---John Le Carre) know they have us over a barrel. Sods, each and every one of them. They won’t tell you the cost of a power chair until they see how much they will wring from your insurance. They laugh smugly all the way to the bank.
There was an elderly woman who desperately needed a power chair, but she was poor, on Medicaid, and didn’t think she could afford one. I convinced her to call Medicaid and she had her chair the next month. It gave her a life! We met for coffee and laughs each weekend.
When I hadn’t seen her in awhile I asked around and was told her battery died and no one would come to her apt. to replace it. Once again she was trapped in her studio apt., just two blocks from a mini-mall full of cheap coffee, lots of people-watching, and, well, me!
This is another SOB, oops my bad, SOD trick to make money. So I contacted them and threatened to report them to the Washington State Atty. General’s office; I also spoke to a rep. for the company owner located in Oregon. The next week Lillian was back in her power chair. They went to her apt. and replaced the battery, bill to Medicaid.
If you are disabled and have “people” like Montel Williams (for a grab out of the hat example) or family members nearby, then you can bypass some SOBs, er, SODs, (So sorry, my numb finger hit’s the wrong letter.) and get on with life without skipping a beat. But it will be many moons (interpret as you wish) before there is a retail store selling reasonably priced products for people with disabilities. Is this discrimination? Well, what do YOU think?

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Diane J Standiford said...

When my power chair needs a new battery: $98 at local auto store, $350 to have a person stop by my home and install one. I contacted my local National Multiple Sclerosis chapter, could they help me? Could they pick up an auto parts battery for me and install it? Nope. They referred me back to the power chair monopoly store in my city. Thanks a lot.
I and millions of others can’t replace our own dead power chair and scooter batteries. The sellers of the disabled, or S.O.D. (from Merriam Webster: British--Bugger: If I ever find the sod I’ll kill him---John Le Carre) know they have us over a barrel. Sods, each and every one of them. They won’t tell you the cost of a power chair until they see how much they will wring from your insurance. They laugh smugly all the way to the bank.
There was an elderly woman who desperately needed a power chair, but she was poor, on Medicaid, and didn’t think she could afford one. I convinced her to call Medicaid and she had her chair the next month. It gave her a life! We met for coffee and laughs each weekend.
When I hadn’t seen her in awhile I asked around and was told her battery died and no one would come to her apt. to replace it. Once again she was trapped in her studio apt., just two blocks from a mini-mall full of cheap coffee, lots of people-watching, and, well, me!
This is another SOB, oops my bad, SOD trick to make money. So I contacted them and threatened to report them to the Washington State Atty. General’s office; I also spoke to a rep. for the company owner located in Oregon. The next week Lillian was back in her power chair. They went to her apt. and replaced the battery, bill to Medicaid.
If you are disabled and have “people” like Montel Williams (for a grab out of the hat example) or family members nearby, then you can bypass some SOBs, er, SODs, (So sorry, my numb finger hit’s the wrong letter.) and get on with life without skipping a beat. But it will be many moons (interpret as you wish) before there is a retail store selling reasonably priced products for people with disabilities. Is this discrimination? Well, what do YOU think?

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seahorse said...

When my power chair needs a new battery: $98 at local auto store, $350 to have a person stop by my home and install one. I contacted my local National Multiple Sclerosis chapter, could they help me? Could they pick up an auto parts battery for me and install it? Nope. They referred me back to the power chair monopoly store in my city. Thanks a lot.
I and millions of others can’t replace our own dead power chair and scooter batteries. The sellers of the disabled, or S.O.D. (from Merriam Webster: British--Bugger: If I ever find the sod I’ll kill him---John Le Carre) know they have us over a barrel. Sods, each and every one of them. They won’t tell you the cost of a power chair until they see how much they will wring from your insurance. They laugh smugly all the way to the bank.
There was an elderly woman who desperately needed a power chair, but she was poor, on Medicaid, and didn’t think she could afford one. I convinced her to call Medicaid and she had her chair the next month. It gave her a life! We met for coffee and laughs each weekend.
When I hadn’t seen her in awhile I asked around and was told her battery died and no one would come to her apt. to replace it. Once again she was trapped in her studio apt., just two blocks from a mini-mall full of cheap coffee, lots of people-watching, and, well, me!
This is another SOB, oops my bad, SOD trick to make money. So I contacted them and threatened to report them to the Washington State Atty. General’s office; I also spoke to a rep. for the company owner located in Oregon. The next week Lillian was back in her power chair. They went to her apt. and replaced the battery, bill to Medicaid.
If you are disabled and have “people” like Montel Williams (for a grab out of the hat example) or family members nearby, then you can bypass some SOBs, er, SODs, (So sorry, my numb finger hit’s the wrong letter.) and get on with life without skipping a beat. But it will be many moons (interpret as you wish) before there is a retail store selling reasonably priced products for people with disabilities. Is this discrimination? Well, what do YOU think?

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Miss Waxie aka A Comic Life, Indeed said...

When my power chair needs a new battery: $98 at local auto store, $350 to have a person stop by my home and install one. I contacted my local National Multiple Sclerosis chapter, could they help me? Could they pick up an auto parts battery for me and install it? Nope. They referred me back to the power chair monopoly store in my city. Thanks a lot.
I and millions of others can’t replace our own dead power chair and scooter batteries. The sellers of the disabled, or S.O.D. (from Merriam Webster: British--Bugger: If I ever find the sod I’ll kill him---John Le Carre) know they have us over a barrel. Sods, each and every one of them. They won’t tell you the cost of a power chair until they see how much they will wring from your insurance. They laugh smugly all the way to the bank.
There was an elderly woman who desperately needed a power chair, but she was poor, on Medicaid, and didn’t think she could afford one. I convinced her to call Medicaid and she had her chair the next month. It gave her a life! We met for coffee and laughs each weekend.
When I hadn’t seen her in awhile I asked around and was told her battery died and no one would come to her apt. to replace it. Once again she was trapped in her studio apt., just two blocks from a mini-mall full of cheap coffee, lots of people-watching, and, well, me!
This is another SOB, oops my bad, SOD trick to make money. So I contacted them and threatened to report them to the Washington State Atty. General’s office; I also spoke to a rep. for the company owner located in Oregon. The next week Lillian was back in her power chair. They went to her apt. and replaced the battery, bill to Medicaid.
If you are disabled and have “people” like Montel Williams (for a grab out of the hat example) or family members nearby, then you can bypass some SOBs, er, SODs, (So sorry, my numb finger hit’s the wrong letter.) and get on with life without skipping a beat. But it will be many moons (interpret as you wish) before there is a retail store selling reasonably priced products for people with disabilities. Is this discrimination? Well, what do YOU think?

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awb said...

When my power chair needs a new battery: $98 at local auto store, $350 to have a person stop by my home and install one. I contacted my local National Multiple Sclerosis chapter, could they help me? Could they pick up an auto parts battery for me and install it? Nope. They referred me back to the power chair monopoly store in my city. Thanks a lot.
I and millions of others can’t replace our own dead power chair and scooter batteries. The sellers of the disabled, or S.O.D. (from Merriam Webster: British--Bugger: If I ever find the sod I’ll kill him---John Le Carre) know they have us over a barrel. Sods, each and every one of them. They won’t tell you the cost of a power chair until they see how much they will wring from your insurance. They laugh smugly all the way to the bank.
There was an elderly woman who desperately needed a power chair, but she was poor, on Medicaid, and didn’t think she could afford one. I convinced her to call Medicaid and she had her chair the next month. It gave her a life! We met for coffee and laughs each weekend.
When I hadn’t seen her in awhile I asked around and was told her battery died and no one would come to her apt. to replace it. Once again she was trapped in her studio apt., just two blocks from a mini-mall full of cheap coffee, lots of people-watching, and, well, me!
This is another SOB, oops my bad, SOD trick to make money. So I contacted them and threatened to report them to the Washington State Atty. General’s office; I also spoke to a rep. for the company owner located in Oregon. The next week Lillian was back in her power chair. They went to her apt. and replaced the battery, bill to Medicaid.
If you are disabled and have “people” like Montel Williams (for a grab out of the hat example) or family members nearby, then you can bypass some SOBs, er, SODs, (So sorry, my numb finger hit’s the wrong letter.) and get on with life without skipping a beat. But it will be many moons (interpret as you wish) before there is a retail store selling reasonably priced products for people with disabilities. Is this discrimination? Well, what do YOU think?

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