Tuesday, November 29, 2011

On The View: Richard Cohen MS Realist and Best Spokesperson

The best spokesperson for multiple sclerosis is Richard Cohen. Yesterday he appeared on the TV show The View, with his wife Meredith Vieira. I am a big fan of his books about living with a chronic illness: "Blindsided: Lifting a Life Above Illness: A Reluctant Memoir," and "Strong at the Broken Places," which I have been greatly inspired by. (under label MS, you can read more about that from my blog)

When I become frustrated with people slobbering over Montel Williams as a "great spokesperson for MS," I calm myself by thinking about Richard Cohen.

Richard Cohen is the real deal. He has lived with MS over 40 years. He said yesterday that people seem to want to ignore the "progressive" nature of MS. He was unhappy with the fact that more is spent in the U.S. on our 'war' in Pakistan in 2-1/2 months than for illness in a year.
He noted how poorly the NIH (National Institutes of Health) is funded, how stem cell help for MS is far away. Maybe I like him so much because he agrees with me on this point: There have been no significant advances towards curing MS.

Many are afraid to speak the truth about MS. Many are afraid to hear it. Many doctors have lied to me because it made them feel better than if they had to speak the truth. Many people with MS latch onto the latest cure-craze (FDA be damned! I feel great now!) until it fails them. But if you live with MS long enough you will, with RARE exception, finally accept your diagnosis: You have MS, a chronic, progressive, disease without a cure.

Accepting those facts about MS, has allowed me to keep moving on with my life, allowed me to plan for the future, and allowed me to prepare my loved ones for what lies ahead. I don't waste time chasing rainbows for that pot of cure at the end. Like Richard, I have a LIFE to live!

Cane by his side, he still maneuvers the city streets and subways, while being legally blind. He also is a cancer survivor and I can relate to that as well. On Face book, so much depression over people's diagnosis of MS...I offer what advice I can, lend an ear, (( ))s, but I feel SOMEBODY needs to give them a reality check. MS may be only one health issue you will need to fight in your young life! I thought when I got MS, "Well, this will be my issue." I never dreamed ovarian cancer would be dropped on me within 5 years.

Richard Cohen survived his cancer as he does his MS, with a glorious sense of humor, a determination to keep a purpose beyond making money from his illness (You will NEVER find him selling blenders or giving lectures on how to 'beat MS.'), and his keen interest in learning about others. I always get the feeling that if he could, he would never speak about his MS. But, that is not an option for those who live with it.

A cane is almost like having a dog by your side, strangers use it to start a conversation, especially if you look, by all other standards, "good." Once you are using a wheel chair or power chair, here come the questions. If he were not married to a TV celebrity wife, he probably would be just another guy with MS. The ones we never hear about. The ones who have studied their disease and get on with living until they die. Like me, like all of us, we think we will be the ones who don't progress, who live long enough for a cure, who will NOT die WITH MS. Now, in 2011, I don't think that way anymore. I think I will indeed die with MS. But, I agree with Cohen on this thought of his too: " You know on every level that it is a one-way trip. You're never going to cross back over. I deny the certainty of possible outcomes. It really frees you up." Or as I have said many times, I think of my MS always and never.

If you want to be inspired, read his books and look for the current AARP magazine cover story about this amazing man who just happens to have MS.

12 comments:

OldOldLady Of The Hills said...

The best spokesperson for multiple sclerosis is Richard Cohen. Yesterday he appeared on the TV show The View, with his wife Meredith Vieira. I am a big fan of his books about living with a chronic illness: "Blindsided: Lifting a Life Above Illness: A Reluctant Memoir," and "Strong at the Broken Places," which I have been greatly inspired by. (under label MS, you can read more about that from my blog)

When I become frustrated with people slobbering over Montel Williams as a "great spokesperson for MS," I calm myself by thinking about Richard Cohen.

Richard Cohen is the real deal. He has lived with MS over 40 years. He said yesterday that people seem to want to ignore the "progressive" nature of MS. He was unhappy with the fact that more is spent in the U.S. on our 'war' in Pakistan in 2-1/2 months than for illness in a year.
He noted how poorly the NIH (National Institutes of Health) is funded, how stem cell help for MS is far away. Maybe I like him so much because he agrees with me on this point: There have been no significant advances towards curing MS.

Many are afraid to speak the truth about MS. Many are afraid to hear it. Many doctors have lied to me because it made them feel better than if they had to speak the truth. Many people with MS latch onto the latest cure-craze (FDA be damned! I feel great now!) until it fails them. But if you live with MS long enough you will, with RARE exception, finally accept your diagnosis: You have MS, a chronic, progressive, disease without a cure.

Accepting those facts about MS, has allowed me to keep moving on with my life, allowed me to plan for the future, and allowed me to prepare my loved ones for what lies ahead. I don't waste time chasing rainbows for that pot of cure at the end. Like Richard, I have a LIFE to live!

Cane by his side, he still maneuvers the city streets and subways, while being legally blind. He also is a cancer survivor and I can relate to that as well. On Face book, so much depression over people's diagnosis of MS...I offer what advice I can, lend an ear, (( ))s, but I feel SOMEBODY needs to give them a reality check. MS may be only one health issue you will need to fight in your young life! I thought when I got MS, "Well, this will be my issue." I never dreamed ovarian cancer would be dropped on me within 5 years.

Richard Cohen survived his cancer as he does his MS, with a glorious sense of humor, a determination to keep a purpose beyond making money from his illness (You will NEVER find him selling blenders or giving lectures on how to 'beat MS.'), and his keen interest in learning about others. I always get the feeling that if he could, he would never speak about his MS. But, that is not an option for those who live with it.

A cane is almost like having a dog by your side, strangers use it to start a conversation, especially if you look, by all other standards, "good." Once you are using a wheel chair or power chair, here come the questions. If he were not married to a TV celebrity wife, he probably would be just another guy with MS. The ones we never hear about. The ones who have studied their disease and get on with living until they die. Like me, like all of us, we think we will be the ones who don't progress, who live long enough for a cure, who will NOT die WITH MS. Now, in 2011, I don't think that way anymore. I think I will indeed die with MS. But, I agree with Cohen on this thought of his too: " You know on every level that it is a one-way trip. You're never going to cross back over. I deny the certainty of possible outcomes. It really frees you up." Or as I have said many times, I think of my MS always and never.

If you want to be inspired, read his books and look for the current AARP magazine cover story about this amazing man who just happens to have MS.

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Karen said...

The best spokesperson for multiple sclerosis is Richard Cohen. Yesterday he appeared on the TV show The View, with his wife Meredith Vieira. I am a big fan of his books about living with a chronic illness: "Blindsided: Lifting a Life Above Illness: A Reluctant Memoir," and "Strong at the Broken Places," which I have been greatly inspired by. (under label MS, you can read more about that from my blog)

When I become frustrated with people slobbering over Montel Williams as a "great spokesperson for MS," I calm myself by thinking about Richard Cohen.

Richard Cohen is the real deal. He has lived with MS over 40 years. He said yesterday that people seem to want to ignore the "progressive" nature of MS. He was unhappy with the fact that more is spent in the U.S. on our 'war' in Pakistan in 2-1/2 months than for illness in a year.
He noted how poorly the NIH (National Institutes of Health) is funded, how stem cell help for MS is far away. Maybe I like him so much because he agrees with me on this point: There have been no significant advances towards curing MS.

Many are afraid to speak the truth about MS. Many are afraid to hear it. Many doctors have lied to me because it made them feel better than if they had to speak the truth. Many people with MS latch onto the latest cure-craze (FDA be damned! I feel great now!) until it fails them. But if you live with MS long enough you will, with RARE exception, finally accept your diagnosis: You have MS, a chronic, progressive, disease without a cure.

Accepting those facts about MS, has allowed me to keep moving on with my life, allowed me to plan for the future, and allowed me to prepare my loved ones for what lies ahead. I don't waste time chasing rainbows for that pot of cure at the end. Like Richard, I have a LIFE to live!

Cane by his side, he still maneuvers the city streets and subways, while being legally blind. He also is a cancer survivor and I can relate to that as well. On Face book, so much depression over people's diagnosis of MS...I offer what advice I can, lend an ear, (( ))s, but I feel SOMEBODY needs to give them a reality check. MS may be only one health issue you will need to fight in your young life! I thought when I got MS, "Well, this will be my issue." I never dreamed ovarian cancer would be dropped on me within 5 years.

Richard Cohen survived his cancer as he does his MS, with a glorious sense of humor, a determination to keep a purpose beyond making money from his illness (You will NEVER find him selling blenders or giving lectures on how to 'beat MS.'), and his keen interest in learning about others. I always get the feeling that if he could, he would never speak about his MS. But, that is not an option for those who live with it.

A cane is almost like having a dog by your side, strangers use it to start a conversation, especially if you look, by all other standards, "good." Once you are using a wheel chair or power chair, here come the questions. If he were not married to a TV celebrity wife, he probably would be just another guy with MS. The ones we never hear about. The ones who have studied their disease and get on with living until they die. Like me, like all of us, we think we will be the ones who don't progress, who live long enough for a cure, who will NOT die WITH MS. Now, in 2011, I don't think that way anymore. I think I will indeed die with MS. But, I agree with Cohen on this thought of his too: " You know on every level that it is a one-way trip. You're never going to cross back over. I deny the certainty of possible outcomes. It really frees you up." Or as I have said many times, I think of my MS always and never.

If you want to be inspired, read his books and look for the current AARP magazine cover story about this amazing man who just happens to have MS.

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Sue Jackson said...

The best spokesperson for multiple sclerosis is Richard Cohen. Yesterday he appeared on the TV show The View, with his wife Meredith Vieira. I am a big fan of his books about living with a chronic illness: "Blindsided: Lifting a Life Above Illness: A Reluctant Memoir," and "Strong at the Broken Places," which I have been greatly inspired by. (under label MS, you can read more about that from my blog)

When I become frustrated with people slobbering over Montel Williams as a "great spokesperson for MS," I calm myself by thinking about Richard Cohen.

Richard Cohen is the real deal. He has lived with MS over 40 years. He said yesterday that people seem to want to ignore the "progressive" nature of MS. He was unhappy with the fact that more is spent in the U.S. on our 'war' in Pakistan in 2-1/2 months than for illness in a year.
He noted how poorly the NIH (National Institutes of Health) is funded, how stem cell help for MS is far away. Maybe I like him so much because he agrees with me on this point: There have been no significant advances towards curing MS.

Many are afraid to speak the truth about MS. Many are afraid to hear it. Many doctors have lied to me because it made them feel better than if they had to speak the truth. Many people with MS latch onto the latest cure-craze (FDA be damned! I feel great now!) until it fails them. But if you live with MS long enough you will, with RARE exception, finally accept your diagnosis: You have MS, a chronic, progressive, disease without a cure.

Accepting those facts about MS, has allowed me to keep moving on with my life, allowed me to plan for the future, and allowed me to prepare my loved ones for what lies ahead. I don't waste time chasing rainbows for that pot of cure at the end. Like Richard, I have a LIFE to live!

Cane by his side, he still maneuvers the city streets and subways, while being legally blind. He also is a cancer survivor and I can relate to that as well. On Face book, so much depression over people's diagnosis of MS...I offer what advice I can, lend an ear, (( ))s, but I feel SOMEBODY needs to give them a reality check. MS may be only one health issue you will need to fight in your young life! I thought when I got MS, "Well, this will be my issue." I never dreamed ovarian cancer would be dropped on me within 5 years.

Richard Cohen survived his cancer as he does his MS, with a glorious sense of humor, a determination to keep a purpose beyond making money from his illness (You will NEVER find him selling blenders or giving lectures on how to 'beat MS.'), and his keen interest in learning about others. I always get the feeling that if he could, he would never speak about his MS. But, that is not an option for those who live with it.

A cane is almost like having a dog by your side, strangers use it to start a conversation, especially if you look, by all other standards, "good." Once you are using a wheel chair or power chair, here come the questions. If he were not married to a TV celebrity wife, he probably would be just another guy with MS. The ones we never hear about. The ones who have studied their disease and get on with living until they die. Like me, like all of us, we think we will be the ones who don't progress, who live long enough for a cure, who will NOT die WITH MS. Now, in 2011, I don't think that way anymore. I think I will indeed die with MS. But, I agree with Cohen on this thought of his too: " You know on every level that it is a one-way trip. You're never going to cross back over. I deny the certainty of possible outcomes. It really frees you up." Or as I have said many times, I think of my MS always and never.

If you want to be inspired, read his books and look for the current AARP magazine cover story about this amazing man who just happens to have MS.

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Travelogue for the Universe said...

The best spokesperson for multiple sclerosis is Richard Cohen. Yesterday he appeared on the TV show The View, with his wife Meredith Vieira. I am a big fan of his books about living with a chronic illness: "Blindsided: Lifting a Life Above Illness: A Reluctant Memoir," and "Strong at the Broken Places," which I have been greatly inspired by. (under label MS, you can read more about that from my blog)

When I become frustrated with people slobbering over Montel Williams as a "great spokesperson for MS," I calm myself by thinking about Richard Cohen.

Richard Cohen is the real deal. He has lived with MS over 40 years. He said yesterday that people seem to want to ignore the "progressive" nature of MS. He was unhappy with the fact that more is spent in the U.S. on our 'war' in Pakistan in 2-1/2 months than for illness in a year.
He noted how poorly the NIH (National Institutes of Health) is funded, how stem cell help for MS is far away. Maybe I like him so much because he agrees with me on this point: There have been no significant advances towards curing MS.

Many are afraid to speak the truth about MS. Many are afraid to hear it. Many doctors have lied to me because it made them feel better than if they had to speak the truth. Many people with MS latch onto the latest cure-craze (FDA be damned! I feel great now!) until it fails them. But if you live with MS long enough you will, with RARE exception, finally accept your diagnosis: You have MS, a chronic, progressive, disease without a cure.

Accepting those facts about MS, has allowed me to keep moving on with my life, allowed me to plan for the future, and allowed me to prepare my loved ones for what lies ahead. I don't waste time chasing rainbows for that pot of cure at the end. Like Richard, I have a LIFE to live!

Cane by his side, he still maneuvers the city streets and subways, while being legally blind. He also is a cancer survivor and I can relate to that as well. On Face book, so much depression over people's diagnosis of MS...I offer what advice I can, lend an ear, (( ))s, but I feel SOMEBODY needs to give them a reality check. MS may be only one health issue you will need to fight in your young life! I thought when I got MS, "Well, this will be my issue." I never dreamed ovarian cancer would be dropped on me within 5 years.

Richard Cohen survived his cancer as he does his MS, with a glorious sense of humor, a determination to keep a purpose beyond making money from his illness (You will NEVER find him selling blenders or giving lectures on how to 'beat MS.'), and his keen interest in learning about others. I always get the feeling that if he could, he would never speak about his MS. But, that is not an option for those who live with it.

A cane is almost like having a dog by your side, strangers use it to start a conversation, especially if you look, by all other standards, "good." Once you are using a wheel chair or power chair, here come the questions. If he were not married to a TV celebrity wife, he probably would be just another guy with MS. The ones we never hear about. The ones who have studied their disease and get on with living until they die. Like me, like all of us, we think we will be the ones who don't progress, who live long enough for a cure, who will NOT die WITH MS. Now, in 2011, I don't think that way anymore. I think I will indeed die with MS. But, I agree with Cohen on this thought of his too: " You know on every level that it is a one-way trip. You're never going to cross back over. I deny the certainty of possible outcomes. It really frees you up." Or as I have said many times, I think of my MS always and never.

If you want to be inspired, read his books and look for the current AARP magazine cover story about this amazing man who just happens to have MS.

Stumble Upon Toolbar
Displaced said...

The best spokesperson for multiple sclerosis is Richard Cohen. Yesterday he appeared on the TV show The View, with his wife Meredith Vieira. I am a big fan of his books about living with a chronic illness: "Blindsided: Lifting a Life Above Illness: A Reluctant Memoir," and "Strong at the Broken Places," which I have been greatly inspired by. (under label MS, you can read more about that from my blog)

When I become frustrated with people slobbering over Montel Williams as a "great spokesperson for MS," I calm myself by thinking about Richard Cohen.

Richard Cohen is the real deal. He has lived with MS over 40 years. He said yesterday that people seem to want to ignore the "progressive" nature of MS. He was unhappy with the fact that more is spent in the U.S. on our 'war' in Pakistan in 2-1/2 months than for illness in a year.
He noted how poorly the NIH (National Institutes of Health) is funded, how stem cell help for MS is far away. Maybe I like him so much because he agrees with me on this point: There have been no significant advances towards curing MS.

Many are afraid to speak the truth about MS. Many are afraid to hear it. Many doctors have lied to me because it made them feel better than if they had to speak the truth. Many people with MS latch onto the latest cure-craze (FDA be damned! I feel great now!) until it fails them. But if you live with MS long enough you will, with RARE exception, finally accept your diagnosis: You have MS, a chronic, progressive, disease without a cure.

Accepting those facts about MS, has allowed me to keep moving on with my life, allowed me to plan for the future, and allowed me to prepare my loved ones for what lies ahead. I don't waste time chasing rainbows for that pot of cure at the end. Like Richard, I have a LIFE to live!

Cane by his side, he still maneuvers the city streets and subways, while being legally blind. He also is a cancer survivor and I can relate to that as well. On Face book, so much depression over people's diagnosis of MS...I offer what advice I can, lend an ear, (( ))s, but I feel SOMEBODY needs to give them a reality check. MS may be only one health issue you will need to fight in your young life! I thought when I got MS, "Well, this will be my issue." I never dreamed ovarian cancer would be dropped on me within 5 years.

Richard Cohen survived his cancer as he does his MS, with a glorious sense of humor, a determination to keep a purpose beyond making money from his illness (You will NEVER find him selling blenders or giving lectures on how to 'beat MS.'), and his keen interest in learning about others. I always get the feeling that if he could, he would never speak about his MS. But, that is not an option for those who live with it.

A cane is almost like having a dog by your side, strangers use it to start a conversation, especially if you look, by all other standards, "good." Once you are using a wheel chair or power chair, here come the questions. If he were not married to a TV celebrity wife, he probably would be just another guy with MS. The ones we never hear about. The ones who have studied their disease and get on with living until they die. Like me, like all of us, we think we will be the ones who don't progress, who live long enough for a cure, who will NOT die WITH MS. Now, in 2011, I don't think that way anymore. I think I will indeed die with MS. But, I agree with Cohen on this thought of his too: " You know on every level that it is a one-way trip. You're never going to cross back over. I deny the certainty of possible outcomes. It really frees you up." Or as I have said many times, I think of my MS always and never.

If you want to be inspired, read his books and look for the current AARP magazine cover story about this amazing man who just happens to have MS.

Stumble Upon Toolbar
Webster said...

The best spokesperson for multiple sclerosis is Richard Cohen. Yesterday he appeared on the TV show The View, with his wife Meredith Vieira. I am a big fan of his books about living with a chronic illness: "Blindsided: Lifting a Life Above Illness: A Reluctant Memoir," and "Strong at the Broken Places," which I have been greatly inspired by. (under label MS, you can read more about that from my blog)

When I become frustrated with people slobbering over Montel Williams as a "great spokesperson for MS," I calm myself by thinking about Richard Cohen.

Richard Cohen is the real deal. He has lived with MS over 40 years. He said yesterday that people seem to want to ignore the "progressive" nature of MS. He was unhappy with the fact that more is spent in the U.S. on our 'war' in Pakistan in 2-1/2 months than for illness in a year.
He noted how poorly the NIH (National Institutes of Health) is funded, how stem cell help for MS is far away. Maybe I like him so much because he agrees with me on this point: There have been no significant advances towards curing MS.

Many are afraid to speak the truth about MS. Many are afraid to hear it. Many doctors have lied to me because it made them feel better than if they had to speak the truth. Many people with MS latch onto the latest cure-craze (FDA be damned! I feel great now!) until it fails them. But if you live with MS long enough you will, with RARE exception, finally accept your diagnosis: You have MS, a chronic, progressive, disease without a cure.

Accepting those facts about MS, has allowed me to keep moving on with my life, allowed me to plan for the future, and allowed me to prepare my loved ones for what lies ahead. I don't waste time chasing rainbows for that pot of cure at the end. Like Richard, I have a LIFE to live!

Cane by his side, he still maneuvers the city streets and subways, while being legally blind. He also is a cancer survivor and I can relate to that as well. On Face book, so much depression over people's diagnosis of MS...I offer what advice I can, lend an ear, (( ))s, but I feel SOMEBODY needs to give them a reality check. MS may be only one health issue you will need to fight in your young life! I thought when I got MS, "Well, this will be my issue." I never dreamed ovarian cancer would be dropped on me within 5 years.

Richard Cohen survived his cancer as he does his MS, with a glorious sense of humor, a determination to keep a purpose beyond making money from his illness (You will NEVER find him selling blenders or giving lectures on how to 'beat MS.'), and his keen interest in learning about others. I always get the feeling that if he could, he would never speak about his MS. But, that is not an option for those who live with it.

A cane is almost like having a dog by your side, strangers use it to start a conversation, especially if you look, by all other standards, "good." Once you are using a wheel chair or power chair, here come the questions. If he were not married to a TV celebrity wife, he probably would be just another guy with MS. The ones we never hear about. The ones who have studied their disease and get on with living until they die. Like me, like all of us, we think we will be the ones who don't progress, who live long enough for a cure, who will NOT die WITH MS. Now, in 2011, I don't think that way anymore. I think I will indeed die with MS. But, I agree with Cohen on this thought of his too: " You know on every level that it is a one-way trip. You're never going to cross back over. I deny the certainty of possible outcomes. It really frees you up." Or as I have said many times, I think of my MS always and never.

If you want to be inspired, read his books and look for the current AARP magazine cover story about this amazing man who just happens to have MS.

Stumble Upon Toolbar
Diane J Standiford said...

The best spokesperson for multiple sclerosis is Richard Cohen. Yesterday he appeared on the TV show The View, with his wife Meredith Vieira. I am a big fan of his books about living with a chronic illness: "Blindsided: Lifting a Life Above Illness: A Reluctant Memoir," and "Strong at the Broken Places," which I have been greatly inspired by. (under label MS, you can read more about that from my blog)

When I become frustrated with people slobbering over Montel Williams as a "great spokesperson for MS," I calm myself by thinking about Richard Cohen.

Richard Cohen is the real deal. He has lived with MS over 40 years. He said yesterday that people seem to want to ignore the "progressive" nature of MS. He was unhappy with the fact that more is spent in the U.S. on our 'war' in Pakistan in 2-1/2 months than for illness in a year.
He noted how poorly the NIH (National Institutes of Health) is funded, how stem cell help for MS is far away. Maybe I like him so much because he agrees with me on this point: There have been no significant advances towards curing MS.

Many are afraid to speak the truth about MS. Many are afraid to hear it. Many doctors have lied to me because it made them feel better than if they had to speak the truth. Many people with MS latch onto the latest cure-craze (FDA be damned! I feel great now!) until it fails them. But if you live with MS long enough you will, with RARE exception, finally accept your diagnosis: You have MS, a chronic, progressive, disease without a cure.

Accepting those facts about MS, has allowed me to keep moving on with my life, allowed me to plan for the future, and allowed me to prepare my loved ones for what lies ahead. I don't waste time chasing rainbows for that pot of cure at the end. Like Richard, I have a LIFE to live!

Cane by his side, he still maneuvers the city streets and subways, while being legally blind. He also is a cancer survivor and I can relate to that as well. On Face book, so much depression over people's diagnosis of MS...I offer what advice I can, lend an ear, (( ))s, but I feel SOMEBODY needs to give them a reality check. MS may be only one health issue you will need to fight in your young life! I thought when I got MS, "Well, this will be my issue." I never dreamed ovarian cancer would be dropped on me within 5 years.

Richard Cohen survived his cancer as he does his MS, with a glorious sense of humor, a determination to keep a purpose beyond making money from his illness (You will NEVER find him selling blenders or giving lectures on how to 'beat MS.'), and his keen interest in learning about others. I always get the feeling that if he could, he would never speak about his MS. But, that is not an option for those who live with it.

A cane is almost like having a dog by your side, strangers use it to start a conversation, especially if you look, by all other standards, "good." Once you are using a wheel chair or power chair, here come the questions. If he were not married to a TV celebrity wife, he probably would be just another guy with MS. The ones we never hear about. The ones who have studied their disease and get on with living until they die. Like me, like all of us, we think we will be the ones who don't progress, who live long enough for a cure, who will NOT die WITH MS. Now, in 2011, I don't think that way anymore. I think I will indeed die with MS. But, I agree with Cohen on this thought of his too: " You know on every level that it is a one-way trip. You're never going to cross back over. I deny the certainty of possible outcomes. It really frees you up." Or as I have said many times, I think of my MS always and never.

If you want to be inspired, read his books and look for the current AARP magazine cover story about this amazing man who just happens to have MS.

Stumble Upon Toolbar
Diane J Standiford said...

The best spokesperson for multiple sclerosis is Richard Cohen. Yesterday he appeared on the TV show The View, with his wife Meredith Vieira. I am a big fan of his books about living with a chronic illness: "Blindsided: Lifting a Life Above Illness: A Reluctant Memoir," and "Strong at the Broken Places," which I have been greatly inspired by. (under label MS, you can read more about that from my blog)

When I become frustrated with people slobbering over Montel Williams as a "great spokesperson for MS," I calm myself by thinking about Richard Cohen.

Richard Cohen is the real deal. He has lived with MS over 40 years. He said yesterday that people seem to want to ignore the "progressive" nature of MS. He was unhappy with the fact that more is spent in the U.S. on our 'war' in Pakistan in 2-1/2 months than for illness in a year.
He noted how poorly the NIH (National Institutes of Health) is funded, how stem cell help for MS is far away. Maybe I like him so much because he agrees with me on this point: There have been no significant advances towards curing MS.

Many are afraid to speak the truth about MS. Many are afraid to hear it. Many doctors have lied to me because it made them feel better than if they had to speak the truth. Many people with MS latch onto the latest cure-craze (FDA be damned! I feel great now!) until it fails them. But if you live with MS long enough you will, with RARE exception, finally accept your diagnosis: You have MS, a chronic, progressive, disease without a cure.

Accepting those facts about MS, has allowed me to keep moving on with my life, allowed me to plan for the future, and allowed me to prepare my loved ones for what lies ahead. I don't waste time chasing rainbows for that pot of cure at the end. Like Richard, I have a LIFE to live!

Cane by his side, he still maneuvers the city streets and subways, while being legally blind. He also is a cancer survivor and I can relate to that as well. On Face book, so much depression over people's diagnosis of MS...I offer what advice I can, lend an ear, (( ))s, but I feel SOMEBODY needs to give them a reality check. MS may be only one health issue you will need to fight in your young life! I thought when I got MS, "Well, this will be my issue." I never dreamed ovarian cancer would be dropped on me within 5 years.

Richard Cohen survived his cancer as he does his MS, with a glorious sense of humor, a determination to keep a purpose beyond making money from his illness (You will NEVER find him selling blenders or giving lectures on how to 'beat MS.'), and his keen interest in learning about others. I always get the feeling that if he could, he would never speak about his MS. But, that is not an option for those who live with it.

A cane is almost like having a dog by your side, strangers use it to start a conversation, especially if you look, by all other standards, "good." Once you are using a wheel chair or power chair, here come the questions. If he were not married to a TV celebrity wife, he probably would be just another guy with MS. The ones we never hear about. The ones who have studied their disease and get on with living until they die. Like me, like all of us, we think we will be the ones who don't progress, who live long enough for a cure, who will NOT die WITH MS. Now, in 2011, I don't think that way anymore. I think I will indeed die with MS. But, I agree with Cohen on this thought of his too: " You know on every level that it is a one-way trip. You're never going to cross back over. I deny the certainty of possible outcomes. It really frees you up." Or as I have said many times, I think of my MS always and never.

If you want to be inspired, read his books and look for the current AARP magazine cover story about this amazing man who just happens to have MS.

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Miss Chris said...

The best spokesperson for multiple sclerosis is Richard Cohen. Yesterday he appeared on the TV show The View, with his wife Meredith Vieira. I am a big fan of his books about living with a chronic illness: "Blindsided: Lifting a Life Above Illness: A Reluctant Memoir," and "Strong at the Broken Places," which I have been greatly inspired by. (under label MS, you can read more about that from my blog)

When I become frustrated with people slobbering over Montel Williams as a "great spokesperson for MS," I calm myself by thinking about Richard Cohen.

Richard Cohen is the real deal. He has lived with MS over 40 years. He said yesterday that people seem to want to ignore the "progressive" nature of MS. He was unhappy with the fact that more is spent in the U.S. on our 'war' in Pakistan in 2-1/2 months than for illness in a year.
He noted how poorly the NIH (National Institutes of Health) is funded, how stem cell help for MS is far away. Maybe I like him so much because he agrees with me on this point: There have been no significant advances towards curing MS.

Many are afraid to speak the truth about MS. Many are afraid to hear it. Many doctors have lied to me because it made them feel better than if they had to speak the truth. Many people with MS latch onto the latest cure-craze (FDA be damned! I feel great now!) until it fails them. But if you live with MS long enough you will, with RARE exception, finally accept your diagnosis: You have MS, a chronic, progressive, disease without a cure.

Accepting those facts about MS, has allowed me to keep moving on with my life, allowed me to plan for the future, and allowed me to prepare my loved ones for what lies ahead. I don't waste time chasing rainbows for that pot of cure at the end. Like Richard, I have a LIFE to live!

Cane by his side, he still maneuvers the city streets and subways, while being legally blind. He also is a cancer survivor and I can relate to that as well. On Face book, so much depression over people's diagnosis of MS...I offer what advice I can, lend an ear, (( ))s, but I feel SOMEBODY needs to give them a reality check. MS may be only one health issue you will need to fight in your young life! I thought when I got MS, "Well, this will be my issue." I never dreamed ovarian cancer would be dropped on me within 5 years.

Richard Cohen survived his cancer as he does his MS, with a glorious sense of humor, a determination to keep a purpose beyond making money from his illness (You will NEVER find him selling blenders or giving lectures on how to 'beat MS.'), and his keen interest in learning about others. I always get the feeling that if he could, he would never speak about his MS. But, that is not an option for those who live with it.

A cane is almost like having a dog by your side, strangers use it to start a conversation, especially if you look, by all other standards, "good." Once you are using a wheel chair or power chair, here come the questions. If he were not married to a TV celebrity wife, he probably would be just another guy with MS. The ones we never hear about. The ones who have studied their disease and get on with living until they die. Like me, like all of us, we think we will be the ones who don't progress, who live long enough for a cure, who will NOT die WITH MS. Now, in 2011, I don't think that way anymore. I think I will indeed die with MS. But, I agree with Cohen on this thought of his too: " You know on every level that it is a one-way trip. You're never going to cross back over. I deny the certainty of possible outcomes. It really frees you up." Or as I have said many times, I think of my MS always and never.

If you want to be inspired, read his books and look for the current AARP magazine cover story about this amazing man who just happens to have MS.

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Adi said...

The best spokesperson for multiple sclerosis is Richard Cohen. Yesterday he appeared on the TV show The View, with his wife Meredith Vieira. I am a big fan of his books about living with a chronic illness: "Blindsided: Lifting a Life Above Illness: A Reluctant Memoir," and "Strong at the Broken Places," which I have been greatly inspired by. (under label MS, you can read more about that from my blog)

When I become frustrated with people slobbering over Montel Williams as a "great spokesperson for MS," I calm myself by thinking about Richard Cohen.

Richard Cohen is the real deal. He has lived with MS over 40 years. He said yesterday that people seem to want to ignore the "progressive" nature of MS. He was unhappy with the fact that more is spent in the U.S. on our 'war' in Pakistan in 2-1/2 months than for illness in a year.
He noted how poorly the NIH (National Institutes of Health) is funded, how stem cell help for MS is far away. Maybe I like him so much because he agrees with me on this point: There have been no significant advances towards curing MS.

Many are afraid to speak the truth about MS. Many are afraid to hear it. Many doctors have lied to me because it made them feel better than if they had to speak the truth. Many people with MS latch onto the latest cure-craze (FDA be damned! I feel great now!) until it fails them. But if you live with MS long enough you will, with RARE exception, finally accept your diagnosis: You have MS, a chronic, progressive, disease without a cure.

Accepting those facts about MS, has allowed me to keep moving on with my life, allowed me to plan for the future, and allowed me to prepare my loved ones for what lies ahead. I don't waste time chasing rainbows for that pot of cure at the end. Like Richard, I have a LIFE to live!

Cane by his side, he still maneuvers the city streets and subways, while being legally blind. He also is a cancer survivor and I can relate to that as well. On Face book, so much depression over people's diagnosis of MS...I offer what advice I can, lend an ear, (( ))s, but I feel SOMEBODY needs to give them a reality check. MS may be only one health issue you will need to fight in your young life! I thought when I got MS, "Well, this will be my issue." I never dreamed ovarian cancer would be dropped on me within 5 years.

Richard Cohen survived his cancer as he does his MS, with a glorious sense of humor, a determination to keep a purpose beyond making money from his illness (You will NEVER find him selling blenders or giving lectures on how to 'beat MS.'), and his keen interest in learning about others. I always get the feeling that if he could, he would never speak about his MS. But, that is not an option for those who live with it.

A cane is almost like having a dog by your side, strangers use it to start a conversation, especially if you look, by all other standards, "good." Once you are using a wheel chair or power chair, here come the questions. If he were not married to a TV celebrity wife, he probably would be just another guy with MS. The ones we never hear about. The ones who have studied their disease and get on with living until they die. Like me, like all of us, we think we will be the ones who don't progress, who live long enough for a cure, who will NOT die WITH MS. Now, in 2011, I don't think that way anymore. I think I will indeed die with MS. But, I agree with Cohen on this thought of his too: " You know on every level that it is a one-way trip. You're never going to cross back over. I deny the certainty of possible outcomes. It really frees you up." Or as I have said many times, I think of my MS always and never.

If you want to be inspired, read his books and look for the current AARP magazine cover story about this amazing man who just happens to have MS.

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imascatterbrain said...

The best spokesperson for multiple sclerosis is Richard Cohen. Yesterday he appeared on the TV show The View, with his wife Meredith Vieira. I am a big fan of his books about living with a chronic illness: "Blindsided: Lifting a Life Above Illness: A Reluctant Memoir," and "Strong at the Broken Places," which I have been greatly inspired by. (under label MS, you can read more about that from my blog)

When I become frustrated with people slobbering over Montel Williams as a "great spokesperson for MS," I calm myself by thinking about Richard Cohen.

Richard Cohen is the real deal. He has lived with MS over 40 years. He said yesterday that people seem to want to ignore the "progressive" nature of MS. He was unhappy with the fact that more is spent in the U.S. on our 'war' in Pakistan in 2-1/2 months than for illness in a year.
He noted how poorly the NIH (National Institutes of Health) is funded, how stem cell help for MS is far away. Maybe I like him so much because he agrees with me on this point: There have been no significant advances towards curing MS.

Many are afraid to speak the truth about MS. Many are afraid to hear it. Many doctors have lied to me because it made them feel better than if they had to speak the truth. Many people with MS latch onto the latest cure-craze (FDA be damned! I feel great now!) until it fails them. But if you live with MS long enough you will, with RARE exception, finally accept your diagnosis: You have MS, a chronic, progressive, disease without a cure.

Accepting those facts about MS, has allowed me to keep moving on with my life, allowed me to plan for the future, and allowed me to prepare my loved ones for what lies ahead. I don't waste time chasing rainbows for that pot of cure at the end. Like Richard, I have a LIFE to live!

Cane by his side, he still maneuvers the city streets and subways, while being legally blind. He also is a cancer survivor and I can relate to that as well. On Face book, so much depression over people's diagnosis of MS...I offer what advice I can, lend an ear, (( ))s, but I feel SOMEBODY needs to give them a reality check. MS may be only one health issue you will need to fight in your young life! I thought when I got MS, "Well, this will be my issue." I never dreamed ovarian cancer would be dropped on me within 5 years.

Richard Cohen survived his cancer as he does his MS, with a glorious sense of humor, a determination to keep a purpose beyond making money from his illness (You will NEVER find him selling blenders or giving lectures on how to 'beat MS.'), and his keen interest in learning about others. I always get the feeling that if he could, he would never speak about his MS. But, that is not an option for those who live with it.

A cane is almost like having a dog by your side, strangers use it to start a conversation, especially if you look, by all other standards, "good." Once you are using a wheel chair or power chair, here come the questions. If he were not married to a TV celebrity wife, he probably would be just another guy with MS. The ones we never hear about. The ones who have studied their disease and get on with living until they die. Like me, like all of us, we think we will be the ones who don't progress, who live long enough for a cure, who will NOT die WITH MS. Now, in 2011, I don't think that way anymore. I think I will indeed die with MS. But, I agree with Cohen on this thought of his too: " You know on every level that it is a one-way trip. You're never going to cross back over. I deny the certainty of possible outcomes. It really frees you up." Or as I have said many times, I think of my MS always and never.

If you want to be inspired, read his books and look for the current AARP magazine cover story about this amazing man who just happens to have MS.

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Have Myelin? said...

The best spokesperson for multiple sclerosis is Richard Cohen. Yesterday he appeared on the TV show The View, with his wife Meredith Vieira. I am a big fan of his books about living with a chronic illness: "Blindsided: Lifting a Life Above Illness: A Reluctant Memoir," and "Strong at the Broken Places," which I have been greatly inspired by. (under label MS, you can read more about that from my blog)

When I become frustrated with people slobbering over Montel Williams as a "great spokesperson for MS," I calm myself by thinking about Richard Cohen.

Richard Cohen is the real deal. He has lived with MS over 40 years. He said yesterday that people seem to want to ignore the "progressive" nature of MS. He was unhappy with the fact that more is spent in the U.S. on our 'war' in Pakistan in 2-1/2 months than for illness in a year.
He noted how poorly the NIH (National Institutes of Health) is funded, how stem cell help for MS is far away. Maybe I like him so much because he agrees with me on this point: There have been no significant advances towards curing MS.

Many are afraid to speak the truth about MS. Many are afraid to hear it. Many doctors have lied to me because it made them feel better than if they had to speak the truth. Many people with MS latch onto the latest cure-craze (FDA be damned! I feel great now!) until it fails them. But if you live with MS long enough you will, with RARE exception, finally accept your diagnosis: You have MS, a chronic, progressive, disease without a cure.

Accepting those facts about MS, has allowed me to keep moving on with my life, allowed me to plan for the future, and allowed me to prepare my loved ones for what lies ahead. I don't waste time chasing rainbows for that pot of cure at the end. Like Richard, I have a LIFE to live!

Cane by his side, he still maneuvers the city streets and subways, while being legally blind. He also is a cancer survivor and I can relate to that as well. On Face book, so much depression over people's diagnosis of MS...I offer what advice I can, lend an ear, (( ))s, but I feel SOMEBODY needs to give them a reality check. MS may be only one health issue you will need to fight in your young life! I thought when I got MS, "Well, this will be my issue." I never dreamed ovarian cancer would be dropped on me within 5 years.

Richard Cohen survived his cancer as he does his MS, with a glorious sense of humor, a determination to keep a purpose beyond making money from his illness (You will NEVER find him selling blenders or giving lectures on how to 'beat MS.'), and his keen interest in learning about others. I always get the feeling that if he could, he would never speak about his MS. But, that is not an option for those who live with it.

A cane is almost like having a dog by your side, strangers use it to start a conversation, especially if you look, by all other standards, "good." Once you are using a wheel chair or power chair, here come the questions. If he were not married to a TV celebrity wife, he probably would be just another guy with MS. The ones we never hear about. The ones who have studied their disease and get on with living until they die. Like me, like all of us, we think we will be the ones who don't progress, who live long enough for a cure, who will NOT die WITH MS. Now, in 2011, I don't think that way anymore. I think I will indeed die with MS. But, I agree with Cohen on this thought of his too: " You know on every level that it is a one-way trip. You're never going to cross back over. I deny the certainty of possible outcomes. It really frees you up." Or as I have said many times, I think of my MS always and never.

If you want to be inspired, read his books and look for the current AARP magazine cover story about this amazing man who just happens to have MS.

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