Saturday, February 16, 2013

MS Hallucinations on Baclofen. The Oliver Sacks Book

Spasticity has been one of my most disabling complicators from MS. You might need to read that again. In other words, it is a lasting symptom that has caused permanent walking disability.

From the NIH (National Institute of Health): "Spasticity is stiff or rigid muscles. It may also be called unusual "tightness" or increased muscle tone. Reflexes (for example, a knee-jerk reflex) are stronger or exaggerated. The condition can interfere with walking, movement, or speech."

It is a common symptom of multiple sclerosis. It was time to get out of bed for work at 3AM, and my legs were like logs, brick logs. The more I moved them the better I could move them, but it still was like lifting two logs of bricks. Off to my "Best neurologist in Seattle," who gave me a perscription for Baclofen. YEA!

That night after taking my first dose, I had the weirdest dream. By 3AM I was still dreaming or something because the room was moving in ways a room can't move in this universe. Everything looked odd and I felt otter, yes, like an otter, certainly not human.

The best I could compare it to was when I was 3 years old and got a high fever. I still remember how the walls of my bedroom moved in after me, chasing me. They made me want to run away, and stay to see what else was going to happen. SNAP OUT, DIANE, you are having a hallucination.

It was, natuarlly, the weekend, and I couldn't reach my MS Director of Well-Respected Seattle hospital. So I hit my Pill Book (haha, remember those old-timers? No Google back in the day.) and there under Baclofen was the side effect of hallucinations. But that was not what grabbed me: This drug should be started at the losest dose. Yeah, I had been started on the HIGHEST dose. I was tripping out of my head. 

Yesterday I thought about this after reading an interview with a fave of mine (and I would ONLY go back to study psychology if he were my professor, since he is a professor of neurology at NYU...) Oliver Sacks, who has written a new book, "Hallucinations."

He is a brilliant professor and doctor who happens to agree with me on the sorry state of psychiatry today: label & box patients so their insurance will pay, forget treating THE INDIVIDUAL. Anyway, I've read all of his books and will read this one too. He is exploring what the brain is up to during hallucinatory activity. Since I never did LSD, or any such drugs, OR any more Baclofen (My Dr. took me off immediately, no apology about the wrong dose.), I have not had many hallucinations, but much like our limited knowledge of dreams we just know so little about what our brain is thinking!

So, my advice to you, dear reader, is the same advice my beloved Great Aunt Vi gave to me: "Cut the dose in half!" Okay, no, that is not really my advice. My advice is to read about whatever medicine you are perscribed. They all should come with instructions (have a magnyfying glass handy), but do more research. Talk to your pharmacist. Go to a university or large hospital site on line like The Mayo or Cleveland Clinics.

Take your medicines into your own hands. The minute you digest them they are one with you. You would Google someone you were dating for the first time---it is the least you can do.

In case you are wondering, Aunt Vi lived to 103. In all the years I knew her, she cut her pills in half. About 2 decades ago some genius decided that maybe the same dose for a larger male was too much for a female. Aunt Vi called a lot of things right. I'm not a doctor, nor was she, I'm just sayin'.




6 comments:

OldLady Of The Hills said...

Spasticity has been one of my most disabling complicators from MS. You might need to read that again. In other words, it is a lasting symptom that has caused permanent walking disability.

From the NIH (National Institute of Health): "Spasticity is stiff or rigid muscles. It may also be called unusual "tightness" or increased muscle tone. Reflexes (for example, a knee-jerk reflex) are stronger or exaggerated. The condition can interfere with walking, movement, or speech."

It is a common symptom of multiple sclerosis. It was time to get out of bed for work at 3AM, and my legs were like logs, brick logs. The more I moved them the better I could move them, but it still was like lifting two logs of bricks. Off to my "Best neurologist in Seattle," who gave me a perscription for Baclofen. YEA!

That night after taking my first dose, I had the weirdest dream. By 3AM I was still dreaming or something because the room was moving in ways a room can't move in this universe. Everything looked odd and I felt otter, yes, like an otter, certainly not human.

The best I could compare it to was when I was 3 years old and got a high fever. I still remember how the walls of my bedroom moved in after me, chasing me. They made me want to run away, and stay to see what else was going to happen. SNAP OUT, DIANE, you are having a hallucination.

It was, natuarlly, the weekend, and I couldn't reach my MS Director of Well-Respected Seattle hospital. So I hit my Pill Book (haha, remember those old-timers? No Google back in the day.) and there under Baclofen was the side effect of hallucinations. But that was not what grabbed me: This drug should be started at the losest dose. Yeah, I had been started on the HIGHEST dose. I was tripping out of my head. 

Yesterday I thought about this after reading an interview with a fave of mine (and I would ONLY go back to study psychology if he were my professor, since he is a professor of neurology at NYU...) Oliver Sacks, who has written a new book, "Hallucinations."

He is a brilliant professor and doctor who happens to agree with me on the sorry state of psychiatry today: label & box patients so their insurance will pay, forget treating THE INDIVIDUAL. Anyway, I've read all of his books and will read this one too. He is exploring what the brain is up to during hallucinatory activity. Since I never did LSD, or any such drugs, OR any more Baclofen (My Dr. took me off immediately, no apology about the wrong dose.), I have not had many hallucinations, but much like our limited knowledge of dreams we just know so little about what our brain is thinking!

So, my advice to you, dear reader, is the same advice my beloved Great Aunt Vi gave to me: "Cut the dose in half!" Okay, no, that is not really my advice. My advice is to read about whatever medicine you are perscribed. They all should come with instructions (have a magnyfying glass handy), but do more research. Talk to your pharmacist. Go to a university or large hospital site on line like The Mayo or Cleveland Clinics.

Take your medicines into your own hands. The minute you digest them they are one with you. You would Google someone you were dating for the first time---it is the least you can do.

In case you are wondering, Aunt Vi lived to 103. In all the years I knew her, she cut her pills in half. About 2 decades ago some genius decided that maybe the same dose for a larger male was too much for a female. Aunt Vi called a lot of things right. I'm not a doctor, nor was she, I'm just sayin'.




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Muffie said...

Spasticity has been one of my most disabling complicators from MS. You might need to read that again. In other words, it is a lasting symptom that has caused permanent walking disability.

From the NIH (National Institute of Health): "Spasticity is stiff or rigid muscles. It may also be called unusual "tightness" or increased muscle tone. Reflexes (for example, a knee-jerk reflex) are stronger or exaggerated. The condition can interfere with walking, movement, or speech."

It is a common symptom of multiple sclerosis. It was time to get out of bed for work at 3AM, and my legs were like logs, brick logs. The more I moved them the better I could move them, but it still was like lifting two logs of bricks. Off to my "Best neurologist in Seattle," who gave me a perscription for Baclofen. YEA!

That night after taking my first dose, I had the weirdest dream. By 3AM I was still dreaming or something because the room was moving in ways a room can't move in this universe. Everything looked odd and I felt otter, yes, like an otter, certainly not human.

The best I could compare it to was when I was 3 years old and got a high fever. I still remember how the walls of my bedroom moved in after me, chasing me. They made me want to run away, and stay to see what else was going to happen. SNAP OUT, DIANE, you are having a hallucination.

It was, natuarlly, the weekend, and I couldn't reach my MS Director of Well-Respected Seattle hospital. So I hit my Pill Book (haha, remember those old-timers? No Google back in the day.) and there under Baclofen was the side effect of hallucinations. But that was not what grabbed me: This drug should be started at the losest dose. Yeah, I had been started on the HIGHEST dose. I was tripping out of my head. 

Yesterday I thought about this after reading an interview with a fave of mine (and I would ONLY go back to study psychology if he were my professor, since he is a professor of neurology at NYU...) Oliver Sacks, who has written a new book, "Hallucinations."

He is a brilliant professor and doctor who happens to agree with me on the sorry state of psychiatry today: label & box patients so their insurance will pay, forget treating THE INDIVIDUAL. Anyway, I've read all of his books and will read this one too. He is exploring what the brain is up to during hallucinatory activity. Since I never did LSD, or any such drugs, OR any more Baclofen (My Dr. took me off immediately, no apology about the wrong dose.), I have not had many hallucinations, but much like our limited knowledge of dreams we just know so little about what our brain is thinking!

So, my advice to you, dear reader, is the same advice my beloved Great Aunt Vi gave to me: "Cut the dose in half!" Okay, no, that is not really my advice. My advice is to read about whatever medicine you are perscribed. They all should come with instructions (have a magnyfying glass handy), but do more research. Talk to your pharmacist. Go to a university or large hospital site on line like The Mayo or Cleveland Clinics.

Take your medicines into your own hands. The minute you digest them they are one with you. You would Google someone you were dating for the first time---it is the least you can do.

In case you are wondering, Aunt Vi lived to 103. In all the years I knew her, she cut her pills in half. About 2 decades ago some genius decided that maybe the same dose for a larger male was too much for a female. Aunt Vi called a lot of things right. I'm not a doctor, nor was she, I'm just sayin'.




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twiceshy said...

Spasticity has been one of my most disabling complicators from MS. You might need to read that again. In other words, it is a lasting symptom that has caused permanent walking disability.

From the NIH (National Institute of Health): "Spasticity is stiff or rigid muscles. It may also be called unusual "tightness" or increased muscle tone. Reflexes (for example, a knee-jerk reflex) are stronger or exaggerated. The condition can interfere with walking, movement, or speech."

It is a common symptom of multiple sclerosis. It was time to get out of bed for work at 3AM, and my legs were like logs, brick logs. The more I moved them the better I could move them, but it still was like lifting two logs of bricks. Off to my "Best neurologist in Seattle," who gave me a perscription for Baclofen. YEA!

That night after taking my first dose, I had the weirdest dream. By 3AM I was still dreaming or something because the room was moving in ways a room can't move in this universe. Everything looked odd and I felt otter, yes, like an otter, certainly not human.

The best I could compare it to was when I was 3 years old and got a high fever. I still remember how the walls of my bedroom moved in after me, chasing me. They made me want to run away, and stay to see what else was going to happen. SNAP OUT, DIANE, you are having a hallucination.

It was, natuarlly, the weekend, and I couldn't reach my MS Director of Well-Respected Seattle hospital. So I hit my Pill Book (haha, remember those old-timers? No Google back in the day.) and there under Baclofen was the side effect of hallucinations. But that was not what grabbed me: This drug should be started at the losest dose. Yeah, I had been started on the HIGHEST dose. I was tripping out of my head. 

Yesterday I thought about this after reading an interview with a fave of mine (and I would ONLY go back to study psychology if he were my professor, since he is a professor of neurology at NYU...) Oliver Sacks, who has written a new book, "Hallucinations."

He is a brilliant professor and doctor who happens to agree with me on the sorry state of psychiatry today: label & box patients so their insurance will pay, forget treating THE INDIVIDUAL. Anyway, I've read all of his books and will read this one too. He is exploring what the brain is up to during hallucinatory activity. Since I never did LSD, or any such drugs, OR any more Baclofen (My Dr. took me off immediately, no apology about the wrong dose.), I have not had many hallucinations, but much like our limited knowledge of dreams we just know so little about what our brain is thinking!

So, my advice to you, dear reader, is the same advice my beloved Great Aunt Vi gave to me: "Cut the dose in half!" Okay, no, that is not really my advice. My advice is to read about whatever medicine you are perscribed. They all should come with instructions (have a magnyfying glass handy), but do more research. Talk to your pharmacist. Go to a university or large hospital site on line like The Mayo or Cleveland Clinics.

Take your medicines into your own hands. The minute you digest them they are one with you. You would Google someone you were dating for the first time---it is the least you can do.

In case you are wondering, Aunt Vi lived to 103. In all the years I knew her, she cut her pills in half. About 2 decades ago some genius decided that maybe the same dose for a larger male was too much for a female. Aunt Vi called a lot of things right. I'm not a doctor, nor was she, I'm just sayin'.




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twiceshy said...

Spasticity has been one of my most disabling complicators from MS. You might need to read that again. In other words, it is a lasting symptom that has caused permanent walking disability.

From the NIH (National Institute of Health): "Spasticity is stiff or rigid muscles. It may also be called unusual "tightness" or increased muscle tone. Reflexes (for example, a knee-jerk reflex) are stronger or exaggerated. The condition can interfere with walking, movement, or speech."

It is a common symptom of multiple sclerosis. It was time to get out of bed for work at 3AM, and my legs were like logs, brick logs. The more I moved them the better I could move them, but it still was like lifting two logs of bricks. Off to my "Best neurologist in Seattle," who gave me a perscription for Baclofen. YEA!

That night after taking my first dose, I had the weirdest dream. By 3AM I was still dreaming or something because the room was moving in ways a room can't move in this universe. Everything looked odd and I felt otter, yes, like an otter, certainly not human.

The best I could compare it to was when I was 3 years old and got a high fever. I still remember how the walls of my bedroom moved in after me, chasing me. They made me want to run away, and stay to see what else was going to happen. SNAP OUT, DIANE, you are having a hallucination.

It was, natuarlly, the weekend, and I couldn't reach my MS Director of Well-Respected Seattle hospital. So I hit my Pill Book (haha, remember those old-timers? No Google back in the day.) and there under Baclofen was the side effect of hallucinations. But that was not what grabbed me: This drug should be started at the losest dose. Yeah, I had been started on the HIGHEST dose. I was tripping out of my head. 

Yesterday I thought about this after reading an interview with a fave of mine (and I would ONLY go back to study psychology if he were my professor, since he is a professor of neurology at NYU...) Oliver Sacks, who has written a new book, "Hallucinations."

He is a brilliant professor and doctor who happens to agree with me on the sorry state of psychiatry today: label & box patients so their insurance will pay, forget treating THE INDIVIDUAL. Anyway, I've read all of his books and will read this one too. He is exploring what the brain is up to during hallucinatory activity. Since I never did LSD, or any such drugs, OR any more Baclofen (My Dr. took me off immediately, no apology about the wrong dose.), I have not had many hallucinations, but much like our limited knowledge of dreams we just know so little about what our brain is thinking!

So, my advice to you, dear reader, is the same advice my beloved Great Aunt Vi gave to me: "Cut the dose in half!" Okay, no, that is not really my advice. My advice is to read about whatever medicine you are perscribed. They all should come with instructions (have a magnyfying glass handy), but do more research. Talk to your pharmacist. Go to a university or large hospital site on line like The Mayo or Cleveland Clinics.

Take your medicines into your own hands. The minute you digest them they are one with you. You would Google someone you were dating for the first time---it is the least you can do.

In case you are wondering, Aunt Vi lived to 103. In all the years I knew her, she cut her pills in half. About 2 decades ago some genius decided that maybe the same dose for a larger male was too much for a female. Aunt Vi called a lot of things right. I'm not a doctor, nor was she, I'm just sayin'.




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twiceshy said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Doug Robertson said...

Spasticity has been one of my most disabling complicators from MS. You might need to read that again. In other words, it is a lasting symptom that has caused permanent walking disability.

From the NIH (National Institute of Health): "Spasticity is stiff or rigid muscles. It may also be called unusual "tightness" or increased muscle tone. Reflexes (for example, a knee-jerk reflex) are stronger or exaggerated. The condition can interfere with walking, movement, or speech."

It is a common symptom of multiple sclerosis. It was time to get out of bed for work at 3AM, and my legs were like logs, brick logs. The more I moved them the better I could move them, but it still was like lifting two logs of bricks. Off to my "Best neurologist in Seattle," who gave me a perscription for Baclofen. YEA!

That night after taking my first dose, I had the weirdest dream. By 3AM I was still dreaming or something because the room was moving in ways a room can't move in this universe. Everything looked odd and I felt otter, yes, like an otter, certainly not human.

The best I could compare it to was when I was 3 years old and got a high fever. I still remember how the walls of my bedroom moved in after me, chasing me. They made me want to run away, and stay to see what else was going to happen. SNAP OUT, DIANE, you are having a hallucination.

It was, natuarlly, the weekend, and I couldn't reach my MS Director of Well-Respected Seattle hospital. So I hit my Pill Book (haha, remember those old-timers? No Google back in the day.) and there under Baclofen was the side effect of hallucinations. But that was not what grabbed me: This drug should be started at the losest dose. Yeah, I had been started on the HIGHEST dose. I was tripping out of my head. 

Yesterday I thought about this after reading an interview with a fave of mine (and I would ONLY go back to study psychology if he were my professor, since he is a professor of neurology at NYU...) Oliver Sacks, who has written a new book, "Hallucinations."

He is a brilliant professor and doctor who happens to agree with me on the sorry state of psychiatry today: label & box patients so their insurance will pay, forget treating THE INDIVIDUAL. Anyway, I've read all of his books and will read this one too. He is exploring what the brain is up to during hallucinatory activity. Since I never did LSD, or any such drugs, OR any more Baclofen (My Dr. took me off immediately, no apology about the wrong dose.), I have not had many hallucinations, but much like our limited knowledge of dreams we just know so little about what our brain is thinking!

So, my advice to you, dear reader, is the same advice my beloved Great Aunt Vi gave to me: "Cut the dose in half!" Okay, no, that is not really my advice. My advice is to read about whatever medicine you are perscribed. They all should come with instructions (have a magnyfying glass handy), but do more research. Talk to your pharmacist. Go to a university or large hospital site on line like The Mayo or Cleveland Clinics.

Take your medicines into your own hands. The minute you digest them they are one with you. You would Google someone you were dating for the first time---it is the least you can do.

In case you are wondering, Aunt Vi lived to 103. In all the years I knew her, she cut her pills in half. About 2 decades ago some genius decided that maybe the same dose for a larger male was too much for a female. Aunt Vi called a lot of things right. I'm not a doctor, nor was she, I'm just sayin'.




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