Tuesday, July 1, 2014

MARRIAGE EQUALITY AFTER 35 YEARS

 A Face Book friend recommended a site where I might find an officiant to marry us. The first person who replied was Pastor Dave. He was from the Church of Spiritual Humanism in our area. "I thought we might chat," he said.
I responded sternly in my deepest voice, "Go ahead."

He then told me two stories about himself, his reason for doing such unions, his orphanage work, basically exactly what I needed to hear: this was a man of integrity. An air of integrity is what I wanted surrounding our small apt. wedding ceremony.

Five people is all you need for a wedding: The officiant, a couple wantin' to be hitched, and two witnesses. I made sure to have a spare witness just in case.

My attendees gifts to us would be their time, energy, and effort to make it to our new assisted living home, knowing there would be no food, drinks, music, dancing, and after the "I do" would be a "thanks for coming, now go."

When you are partners who have been denied the legal right to marry for 35 years, both sicker, disabled, no longer the spry young lovers of 22 years old, a quick simple wedding is the greatest gift we could imagine.

I feel very lucky to have lived long enough to experience this day of equality, but must juxtapose that with knowing so many still are denied the freedom.

3 comments:

Ami said...

 A Face Book friend recommended a site where I might find an officiant to marry us. The first person who replied was Pastor Dave. He was from the Church of Spiritual Humanism in our area. "I thought we might chat," he said.
I responded sternly in my deepest voice, "Go ahead."

He then told me two stories about himself, his reason for doing such unions, his orphanage work, basically exactly what I needed to hear: this was a man of integrity. An air of integrity is what I wanted surrounding our small apt. wedding ceremony.

Five people is all you need for a wedding: The officiant, a couple wantin' to be hitched, and two witnesses. I made sure to have a spare witness just in case.

My attendees gifts to us would be their time, energy, and effort to make it to our new assisted living home, knowing there would be no food, drinks, music, dancing, and after the "I do" would be a "thanks for coming, now go."

When you are partners who have been denied the legal right to marry for 35 years, both sicker, disabled, no longer the spry young lovers of 22 years old, a quick simple wedding is the greatest gift we could imagine.

I feel very lucky to have lived long enough to experience this day of equality, but must juxtapose that with knowing so many still are denied the freedom.

Stumble Upon Toolbar
kmilyun said...

 A Face Book friend recommended a site where I might find an officiant to marry us. The first person who replied was Pastor Dave. He was from the Church of Spiritual Humanism in our area. "I thought we might chat," he said.
I responded sternly in my deepest voice, "Go ahead."

He then told me two stories about himself, his reason for doing such unions, his orphanage work, basically exactly what I needed to hear: this was a man of integrity. An air of integrity is what I wanted surrounding our small apt. wedding ceremony.

Five people is all you need for a wedding: The officiant, a couple wantin' to be hitched, and two witnesses. I made sure to have a spare witness just in case.

My attendees gifts to us would be their time, energy, and effort to make it to our new assisted living home, knowing there would be no food, drinks, music, dancing, and after the "I do" would be a "thanks for coming, now go."

When you are partners who have been denied the legal right to marry for 35 years, both sicker, disabled, no longer the spry young lovers of 22 years old, a quick simple wedding is the greatest gift we could imagine.

I feel very lucky to have lived long enough to experience this day of equality, but must juxtapose that with knowing so many still are denied the freedom.

Stumble Upon Toolbar
Judy at Peace Be With You said...

 A Face Book friend recommended a site where I might find an officiant to marry us. The first person who replied was Pastor Dave. He was from the Church of Spiritual Humanism in our area. "I thought we might chat," he said.
I responded sternly in my deepest voice, "Go ahead."

He then told me two stories about himself, his reason for doing such unions, his orphanage work, basically exactly what I needed to hear: this was a man of integrity. An air of integrity is what I wanted surrounding our small apt. wedding ceremony.

Five people is all you need for a wedding: The officiant, a couple wantin' to be hitched, and two witnesses. I made sure to have a spare witness just in case.

My attendees gifts to us would be their time, energy, and effort to make it to our new assisted living home, knowing there would be no food, drinks, music, dancing, and after the "I do" would be a "thanks for coming, now go."

When you are partners who have been denied the legal right to marry for 35 years, both sicker, disabled, no longer the spry young lovers of 22 years old, a quick simple wedding is the greatest gift we could imagine.

I feel very lucky to have lived long enough to experience this day of equality, but must juxtapose that with knowing so many still are denied the freedom.

Stumble Upon Toolbar
 
Outpost